Australian Wallabies


Australian wallabies are small kangaroo looking animals.


There are only three species of kangaroos and three secies of wallaroos in Australia. All the other kangaroo looking animals are wallabies - basically a small version of a kangaroo. They are medium-sized macropods that weigh less than 25 kg and unlike kangaroos, most of them need a shelter. Like with other marsupials, their young are called "joey".

Agile Wallaby, Tyto Wetlands, Ingham, Queensland, Australia. Pacific
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Agile Wallaby, aka Sandy Wallaby
Macropus agilis is a 850mm-long, up to 27kg-heavy sandy brown animal with black ear edges and tail tip. It breeds all year around. Female gives birth to a tiny baby 30 days after mating and the young stays in the pouch for 7-8 months. Females mature at 12 months, males at 14. It is found across northern Australia, from Rockhampton in the east to Broome in the Kimberley in the west. It lives in open forest, woodland and grassland where it eats grass, leaves and fruit, and is known to dig up grass roots from 30cm below the surface. It is a social animal, lives in groups of 10 and forms a mob when feeding.

Agile Wallaby (Macropus Agilis), Kakadu National Park, Australia
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Dama, aka Tammar Wallaby
Macropus eugenii is a small animal, weighing max 10kg, with a dark grey-brown fur. It is found mostly on islands but there are a few mainland populations in south-western WA. They live in woodlands, scrublands and dry Eucalypt forests. They are mostly solitary but can sometimes be seen in groups when feeding. They eat grass and leaves. Breeding season is December to March, and young stays in pouch for about 9 months. They live up to 14 years and the species status is secure.

Dama Wallaby at the Sedgwick County Zoo
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Australian Wallabies - Western Brush Wallaby
Macropus irma is a pale grey animal, 1200mm long and weighs 7-9kg. Its face is dark except the white stripes on cheeks. It lives in open forests and woodland in south-western WA. It is a solitary animal and it eats grass. It breeds between March and May, and its young stay in pouch for 6-7 months.

Parma Wallabys at the Sunset Zoo in Kansas
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Australian Wallabies - Parma Wallaby
Macropus parma is a pale grey-brown animal with white chest, white stripes on cheeks and a dark stripe from head to back. It can be up to 550mm long and weigh up to 6kg. It’s found along Great Dividing Range in New South Wales from Gibraltar Range to Watagan Mountains. It lives in Eucalypt forests where it eats grass and herbs. It is nocturnal and solitary but may feed in couples. Its breeding season is January to June, the young is born 35 days after mating, and stay in pouch for 30 weeks. It is a vulnerable species that was thought to be extinct until it was found in the 1960s.

Parma Wallaby at the Sunset Zoo in Manhattan, Kansas
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Black-striped, aka Scrub Wallaby
Macropus dorsalis is a brown animal with a black stripe from forehead to back. Males can be much larger than females and weigh up to 20kg. It is a very social animal, forms groups of 20 that don’t even split up when alarmed. They live in forest and woodland where they eat grass and leaves in the scrubby undergrowth. Female gives birth to a baby 33-35 days after fertilisation, and the young stays in the pouch for seven months. Females mature at 14 months, males at 20. They live up to 15 years and they are found in northern New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland from Sydney in south to Mackay region in north and a fair bit into inland.

Whiptail Wallaby (Macropus Parryi), Australia
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Whiptail, aka Pretty Faced Wallaby
Macropus parryi is a large animal, up to 850mm tall and weighs up to 26kg. It is light to brownish grey, has a dark face and white cheek stripes. It is found in coastal Queensland and northern New South Wales. It lives in open eucalypt forests in hilly country, where it eats grass, herbs and ferns. Female gives birth to young about 35 days after mating and the young stays in pouch for 37 weeks. The species status is secure.

Red-Necked Pademelon, Thylogale Thetis, or Pademelon Wallaby
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Australian Wallabies - Red-necked Wallaby
There are two sub-species of Macropus rufogriseus. The mainland subspecies, Macropus rufogriseus banksianus, is found in Southern Victoria, western New South Wales and south-eastern Queensland. It lives in eucalypt forests where it eats grasses and herbs. It is grey to reddish brown with black paws. It breeds all year around and the young is born 30 days after fertilisation. The young stays in pouch for 280 days and is independent after 12-17 months.

Red-Necked Pademelon, Thylogale Thetis, or Pademelon Wallaby
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Australian Wallabies - Bennett’s Wallaby
The Tasmanian and Bass Straight Islands subspecies, Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus is commonly known as Bennett’s Wallaby. It is similar to the mainland subspecies but has a browner neck and a longer and darker fur. It breeds from January to July and the young takes the same time to develop as this of the mainland subspecies. It lives in forests and woodlands and eats grass and herbs. Species status of both "red-necks" is secure.

Bennett's Wallaby with Joey, Cradle Mountain-Lake St. Clair National Park, Australia
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Australian Wallabies - Banded Hare Wallaby
Lagostrophus fasciatus is one of the smallest of Australian wallabies that weighs about 1.7kg. It is a nocturnal and social animal, and it eats fruit and grass. Its breeding season is between December and September, and one young is born a few months after fertislisation. The young stays in pouch for six months, and is independent after nine months. Banded Hare-wallaby used to be found in the mainland Australia (South Australia and Western Australia), but today it is only restricted to a few islands in Western Australia (Bernier Island and Dorre Island). It is thought that the causes for its disappearance from the Australian mainland are habitat loss, and competition with and predation by introduced animals.

Tammar Wallaby (Macropus Eugenii), Flinders Chase National Park, Australia
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Bridled Nailtail, aka Bridled Nail tailed Wallaby, Flashjack
Onychogalea fraenata is a grey wallaby, with a bridled stripe along the back. It can grow up to 1m long and weight 4-7kg. It lives in open eucalypt forest where it eats grass, herbs and flowering plants. Bridled Nailtail Wallaby is a solitary nocturnal animal and the female gives birth to one young 23 days after fertilisation. The young stays in the pouch for four months. Bridled Nailtail Wallaby was thought to be extinct since the 1930s, but was rediscovered in 1973 and is now found in rare locations around Dingo in central Queensland.

Tammar Wallaby, (Macropus Eugenii), Flinders Chase N.P., South Australia, Australia
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Where to See Australian Wallabies
Australian Wallabies are easy to see grazing in the wild, particularly at dusk and dawn, but the only way to get close to them is in Australia’s many zoo parks and animal sanctuaries like Melbourne Zoo, Taronga Zoo in Sydney, Lone Pine Koala Sanctuary in Brisbane, Australia Zoo on the Sunshine Coast, Billabong Sanctuary south of Townsville and Kuranda Wildlife Noctarium north of Cairns, along with other Australian animals. In most of these parks you can buy a bag of kangaroo food and feed them.


 













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