Numbats

Numbats are only found in Western Australia.

One of the rare Australian animals and Western Australia’s faunal emblem, numbat, also called the marsupial anteater, is the only living member of the Myrmecobiidae family.


Although it was once found in South Australia and New South Wales, numbat habitat is now restricted to the south-western WA, where it lives in the famous Jarrah and Wandoo forests. 
Numbat
Poster by AllPosters. Click on thumbnail to buy


Numbat (Myrmecobius fasciatus) is a small, 270mm long animal that weighs up to 700g, has a narrow head, brushy tail, and stripes on the body that camouflage it in its open forest habitat.

numbat
By flickkerphotos via Flickr.com

Numbat is one of the very few Australian animals that lives exclusively on termites (another one is echidna) that it catches with its 100-mm long tongue. It eats 20,000 termites a day and it forages during the day, when it can be seen on the forest ground or climbing in trees after termites. Numbat is a solitary and territorial animal. Its territory can be up to 50 hectares large and it has got several nests in burrows and tree logs within its territory.

numbats
By Nick_Lawes via Flickr.com

Its mating season is in January and young are born in late January or early February. The female has got four nipples but no pouch so the young are hanging off her teats for six months until they are independent to be left in a nursery burrow. In September the young start exploring outside world, and by November they leave to find their own territories.

numbat
By flyingblogspot
via Flickr.com

Its species status is vulnerable – less than 2000 individuals are believed to be left in the wild. Land clearing and red foxes are their biggest threat. They have been reintroduced to national parks and nature reserves where control programs reduce introduced predators. Good places to see numbat are Dyandra State Forest, Dragon Rocks Nature Reserve, Perup Forest and the Boyagin Nature Reserve, all in Western Australia.
 













You Are Secure!




Bookmark and Share


[?] Subscribe To This Site

XML RSS
follow us in feedly
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My MSN
Subscribe with Bloglines